How to Define Your Customer Avatar

Within the world of Internet Marketing, defining your customer avatar is an essential part of the process.  What exactly does that even mean? Keep in mind that an avatar is the persona that envelops your key demographic and overall market.  This advanced type of market definition is imperative and should be viewed as one of the primary cornerstones of a successful foundation within this particular industry.  How can you go about defining your customer avatar in the first place?

 

Customer AvatarVisualize the Customer

 

In order to define your customer avatar, you need to first take the steps necessary to visualize your key demographic – the average customer or client that is going to respond well to what you have to offer them.  Picture them in your mind.  Based on the product or service that you are offering, what does your customer look like? Have you been able to identify which priorities are the most important to them?  When you examine the extensive list of their daily problems, worries and anxieties, which one is the biggest one that you are able to solve?  Once you have visualized your customer, then your avatar has officially been created.

 

Plan Hypothetical Scenarios

 

Once you have taken the time to develop your customer avatar, the next step is to plan out the hypothetical scenarios that may occur when you find these individuals and attempt to sell them on the products, services and solutions that your offering.  For example, let's say that your customer avatar is a single parent that works two jobs just to put food on the table.  He or she has to rely on babysitters and day cares to watch their children simply because they are always working and cannot do it themselves.

 

Once you think this particular scenario through, you can easily identify the perfect sales pitch and approach to take in order to close this specific customer.  For instance, you can focus on the fact that your product, service or business opportunity can make it easier for them to make all of the money that they need within a flexible schedule that allows them to get back into the lives of their children.

 

Customer AvatarEstablish a Connection

 

The biggest mistake that you can make is to assume that your customer avatar is an inanimate object or just a potential sales figure.  You need to put yourself in the shoes of your average customer, client and/or prospect.  What would you need to do or say in order to sell yourself if you fit that basic description?  What could you do to completely ruin the opportunity and burn that bridge all together?  Do you see how this situation can easily be flipped to either side of the coin?

 

Make sure that you establish a connection with your customer avatar, because your customers are the lifelines online business.  You need to learn their needs, wants and desires closely on a consistent basis in order to truly understand what you can do to give them everything that they need through when you present your offer to them.

 

Now it's your turn!

 

Have you defined your customer avatar?  If so, what does your customer avatar look like?  Please share your feedback in the comments section and I look forward to reading them!

 

To your Success,


Nate Leung


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Nate Leung

Nate Leung

CEO & Founder @ NateLeung.com at NateLeung.com
Nate Leung is the CEO and Founder of NateLeung.com, and author of "Virtual Entrepreneur: Live Free With the Business of Your Dreams". Nate specializes in helping people take their passion, knowledge, and expertise and bring it to life. You can find out more from Nate by connecting with him over at Google +. If you're struggling and or looking for help, contact Nate here.
Nate Leung
Nate Leung

Add a Comment


42 Responses to “How to Define Your Customer Avatar”

  1. Ryan Biddulph

    Hi Nate,

    Smart tips! Make a connection. Sure the person might fit your avatar profile BUT they are a person, not some perfect fit ready to join right away…and need to be treated as such.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Ryan

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Right on. Thanks Ryan! 🙂

    [Reply]

  2. pam schmidt

    Is it possible to have a couple of types of customer avatars? Perhaps a business person aims business toward young parents, and also aims for bloggers. Would that work? Can’t you merely aim specific topics toward each group?

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Hi Pam,

    It all depends on your message. You could target them separately. I wouldn’t just stick with one customer avatar. Especially if you are starting off, it can be challenging to nail just one customer avatar. Testing is always something you want as part of your online business model. That’s why you’ll see some Network Marketers who are online, target both offline networkers who do not understand the Internet Marketing model and also market to struggling internet network marketers.

    [Reply]

  3. Ketemplate

    It is easier to market and sell to a particular type of person than a diverse range of people. Selling the same mobile phone to an elderly person and someone in their 20s. You would naturally focus on different aspects of the phone depending on who you were talking to at the time. Your marketing would be focused on that particular niche.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Right on! You nailed it!

    [Reply]

  4. Nomusa

    This process comes naturally if your target market are people like you.

    For example if a married professional man targets single working moms to market a product to, they will find it hard to talk to that market segment because they just do not understand them and the problems he can solve for them.

    Make your marketing simpler by talking to a market that you understand.

    Thanks for opening the discussion Nate.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    You’re welcome. Great feedback Nomusa!

    [Reply]

  5. Somer Nelson

    Defining your market gives you a guideline for targeting your brand towards those who are the most likely to seek out your services. Great article. Thanks for all the great tips:)

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Awesome. Glad you enjoyed the tips!

    [Reply]

  6. Nathalie

    Targeting a specific market does not mean that you have to exclude people that do not fit your criteria from buying from you. Rather, target marketing allows you to focus your marketing dollars and brand message on a specific market that is more likely to buy from you than other markets. This is a much more affordable, efficient, and effective way to reach potential clients and generate business. It is easier to market and sell to a particular type of person than a diverse range of people. Great article Nate!

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Thank you Nathalie!

    [Reply]

  7. Greg

    I tend to think that’s not entirely true. We can’t get all the data on a person and their feelings change moment to moment. I think it’s best to present the best message you can and not worry about if they join. Also, not to worry about whether they stay or not. IMO.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Hi Greg,

    I’m not sure exactly what you’re referencing to. Would love to have you provide more clarifty.

    In terms of presenting the best message, here is what separates those who are starting off brand new and those who have been marketing online.

    The difference is that when we all start off, we market to anyone and everyone. This in my opinion is not productive. Reason why I say that is even though most people can benefit from our services and offerings, but will not resonate with everyone. That is why the ones that do not resonate with the product or service, you don’t want to waste your time with those people.

    I understand where you’re coming from, but at the same time, Let’s say you are an organic meat seller and it’s like trying to convince vegetarians that they should eat your organic meat because it’s the best meat on the planet.

    Hope that makes sense. Thank you for the input! 🙂

    [Reply]

  8. grace (@GCRozankovic)

    This is a great post that will provide great value to most people struggling to make it online… I know that i had no idea who or what was my avatar was in the beginning… great share.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    You’re welcome. Thanks Grace!

    [Reply]

  9. Clarissa

    Love it! I wanna help stressed out moms with healthy game plans and strategies to keep their families healthy while feeling confident and sexy and living each day to their highest potential.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Awesome avatar! Thank you Clarissa!

    [Reply]

  10. Stefani McCune

    Love it! I like to go as far as to Name my customer a silly name. Suzie Shopper, Nancy Necklace Buyer (I sell jewelry), etc. All silliness aside, it is so key to know who your target market is. Who are you selling to? And it’s OK to say that you are selling a product or service…not just sharing a message. If you’re just sharing, people won’t buy!

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Hi Stefani,

    Sometimes you just have to ask for that sale. If you don’t ask, you don’t get! Thank you for the comments!

    [Reply]

  11. Victoria

    When you customize your brand/marketing/content to speak directly to the kind of client you want to work with the most, they will recognize you as the person they want to work with because they connect with you right away. You speak the same language. It’s important to get laser focused on your avatar.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Sure is! Thanks VIctoria!

    [Reply]

  12. Judy Wright

    Once you fully understand your Avatar you will be amazed how much easier it is to write marketing messages that hit the spot. What it comes down to is truly understanding your target market is one of the most crucial things when it comes to starting to market and sell products online.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  13. Steve Fursik

    Fantastic!! We can’t deny Businesses nowadays no longer look the way it was before. Though, the great thing there were more and more people Innovate themselves and the new wave of billionaire emerges.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Thank you for the input!

    [Reply]

  14. Katrina

    Excellent foundation content for attracting the right people. Thanks for sharing, Nate!

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    You’re welcome Katrina! Glad you enjoyed it!

    [Reply]

  15. Judy Garey

    Great Post Nate. Yes, I have defined my ideal customer and my ideal customer is who I was the end of 2009. The end of 2009, I was sick and tired of being sick and tired, my entire life had fallen apart, was struggling with depression, agoraphobia and panic attacks and I was ready for change and willing to do whatever it took to create positive change in my life. I overcome all of that and now I support others in overcoming life challenges so that they can finally live a life they love, full of happiness and personal fulfillment. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Hey Judy!

    Glad to see that during that time, everything started to come together. I realize that the end of 2009 was a critical time for you. A time that you realized that something had to change. A long with many other things, everything is working out for the better. Thank you for sharing Judy!

    [Reply]

  16. Jewels

    My Client Avatar ~ Women who need to generate their own business, typically Entrepreneurs, Network Marketers, Sales associates, or women in transition. Women who are interested in growing personally and professionally and would like support and accountability in doing so. Women who want to have fun and give back to charities as well. Thanks for asking!! Chicks Connect is a Global Mastermind Support Network dedicated to connection, action, accountability for personal and professional growth and development all built on a foundation of love, fun, friendship, service and support. <3

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Hi Jewels,

    Awesome stuff! Glad you took the time to share that. Appreciate you for doing that! Have a great week ahead. 🙂

    [Reply]

  17. Matt Ritchey

    My avatar has been shape shifting the last year!
    I am narrowing it down and learning their language patterns and behavior now.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Great stuff Matt! Thanks!

    [Reply]

  18. Jason Power

    Hi Nate,

    This is a great way to perceive your target audience, and develop a plan to reach them effectively. Thanks for the information.

    Jason

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    You’re welcome Jason. Thank you for the comments!

    [Reply]

  19. Alexis Meads

    Great post Nate! It’s so important to define our Customer Avatars – it shaped everything for me. I think visualizing them as an actual person really helps.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Great! Thanks Alexis!

    [Reply]

  20. Chivon

    This is a great post Nate! I’m in the process of updating my customer avatars as I’ve noticed that the needs of my clients and followers have evolved. These are some great tips to keep in mind while I do that exercise.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    That’s awesome Chivon! Thank you for stopping by!

    [Reply]

  21. Sarah

    I think being able to visualize your target market is a key aspect of any business. I find it a little bit amusing that so much of the advice floating around for “online business” is to remind people about the human interaction aspect of doing business. In some ways the Internet has created immense business opportunities that could never had existed otherwise, but at the same time it’s made people really tone-deaf to the intricate realities of building a relationship with your clients because you don’t have those face-to-face experiences.

    [Reply]

    Nate Leung Reply:

    Hi Sarah,

    The reasoning for the online advice about building relationships over the internet is because, technology has a tendency to replace the human element factor and that’s connecting. What most people do not get is that you have to build relationships.

    Here’s an example. People these days would much rather send a Facebook message, text or email versus giving someone a call. This is not always the case but it seems to be the case most of the time.

    You see, building relationships online is no different than to build a relationship offline. You still have to get to know people. The “like”, “know” and “trust” factor comes into play when you are engaging with a person.

    You do bring up a good point but 95% of people miss this. That is why you see so many of the “online business advice” of the human interaction aspect of doing business.

    Just one thing to take home… just because you and I know this, doesn’t mean that 95% of the people doing business online doesn’t. Sometimes we forget that this stuff is easy and simple but not easy and simple to us.

    Thank you for the comments!

    [Reply]